Summertime Fun: Hot Dogs, Picnics And Kids

Summertime Fun: Hot Dogs, Picnics And Kids

As temperatures rise around Louisiana it's become perfectly clear that summer is here. So this week on Louisiana Eats! we're talking about traditional summertime foods, giving you advice for picnics, and hearing how to keep your kids entertained during the hottest part of the year.

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Familiar Voices At The Louisiana Eats! Table

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We've invited some of our favorite guests back for this week's edition of Louisiana Eats! They might have all been on the program before, but they've each got something new to bring to the table.

Environmental reporter Paul Greenberg explains why "the Dead Zone," in the Gulf of Mexico is expected to be larger than ever this summer. On a more light-hearted note, we'll be joined by Chef Tenney Flynn to discuss the strange requests he fulfills at his restaurant for some of his favorite customers.

Plus, Dr. Gourmet returns to the program for a discussion about cholesterol, Jyl Benson tells us about one of her favorite meat markets, and Ryan Hughes slices open some fragrant Australian citrus.

Why Do Louisianians Invest In Culinary Expertise?

  

Students at the Louisiana Culinary Institute had their professional and personal lives taped for an entire semester for a new reality television show called "The Freshmen Class."

Students at the Louisiana Culinary Institute had their professional and personal lives taped for an entire semester for a new reality television show called "The Freshmen Class."

The Tulane University Center for Culinary Medicine has found a new home on Broad Street. We'll be joined by the movers and shakers of the program on this week's Louisiana Eats!, including Dr. Gourmet and the country's first medical school chef.

Then, members of the Louisiana Culinary Institute join us to discuss their experience being filmed for a new reality TV show on the Cooking Channel called The Freshmen Class.

Plus, Harold McGee discusses the science of some household staples, and Frank McMains swings by with another great tip for dining in Louisiana.

Revelations From Unexpected Artifacts

On this week's Louisiana Eats! we'll hear from Professor Jim Heimann as he talks about the evolution of restaurant menus in the the 20th century and how they chart the cultural values of America. Then, documentary filmmaker Peggy Scott Laborde gets nostalgic about New Orleans' favorite food and drinks.

Plus, Dr. Gourmet returns with advice about salt, and Ian McNulty recommends a great spot just outside of Henderson, La.


im Heimann's new book about restaurant menus contains over 500 detailed images.   Credit New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad, 1932 (Private Collection)

im Heimann's new book about restaurant menus contains over 500 detailed images.

Credit New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad, 1932 (Private Collection)

From the Big Apple to the Big Easy

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Culinary historian Michael Twitty harvests rice in South Carolina. Twitty talks about exploring his ancestry on The Southern Discomfort Tour.   CREDIT MICHAEL TWITTY

Culinary historian Michael Twitty harvests rice in South Carolina. Twitty talks about exploring his ancestry on The Southern Discomfort Tour.

CREDIT MICHAEL TWITTY

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, Poppy hears expert advice from a bartender, a culinary historian, and a doctor. First, New York City bartender Don Lee discusses the science of mixing drinks in the Big Apple. Then, Michael Twittytalks about his travels along the Southern Discomfort tour. Finally, Dr. Gourmet returns with advice about keeping healthy in the new year.

Deviled Eggs (Serves 6 - 12)

6 hardboiled eggs

2 tablespoons butter, softened

1/2 teaspoon Creole mustard

1 tablespoon finely diced tasso or ham

1 green onion, finely minced

Salt and hot sauce to taste

Paprika

Peel eggs and cut in half through the middle of the egg instead of the usual length of the egg.  (This way the deviled eggs will fit into egg cartons for easy transportation.)  Remove yolk and mash together with softened butter and Creole mustard. Mix in tasso and green onion. Then, season with salt and hot sauce to taste. 

Put stuffing in a pastry bag or a plastic zip lock bag with the tip cut off.  Pipe filling into egg halves and place back into egg carton.  Garnish with a sprinkle of paprika.  Refrigerate eggs but allow them to cool to room temperature when serving.

You’ll want to collect some washed, empty egg cartons to bring dozens of these delicious eggs with you to any celebration.  Also, stick a toothpick in each carton to help lift them out of the carton when serving.