Louisiana Eats! Celebrates The Lunar New Year

Louisiana Eats! Celebrates The Lunar New Year

Mardi Gras may be over, but festivities for the Lunar New Year have just begun! On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we celebrate the Year of the Goat the way they do in China, with a baijiu toast, courtesy of baijiu enthusiast Derek Sandhaus. Derek explains to us the story behind the ancient Chinese liquor and its recent emergence in the West.

Read More

How Three Foodies Stay At The Top Of Their Field

How Three Foodies Stay At The Top Of Their Field

For the past twenty years Dana Cowin has been Food & Wine's editor in chief, but has keep a secret from her readers. Despite being surrounded by food nearly every single day, she never learned how to cook. But with the help of her friends, many of them famous celebrity chefs, Dana has mastered her mistakes in the kitchen and learned some invaluable life skills along the way. 

Read More

On The Record With Donald Link: Candid Stories From A Bold Chef

On The Record With Donald Link: Candid Stories From A Bold Chef

t one point during his cooking career, Donald Link's co-workers nicknamed him "Hot Shot." Was it deserved? That depends on who you ask. Donald shares his side of the story with us in a revealing interview that takes you from the rock and roll kitchens of San Francisco to his award-winning restaurants in New Orleans.

Read More

Let's Hear It For The Boys

flickr_dulhunk.jpg

In honor of Father's Day we're chatting with the boys on this week's Louisiana Eats!.

Chocolatier Tariq Hanna joins us to discuss what inspires his work at Sucré and how cakes have brought him to the White House. Then we'll hear how Jay Bentley, a very masculine chef from Montana, imports the flavors of New Orleans to Big Sky country.

We'll also be joined by Ian McNulty, who tells us which town in Louisiana has the most mouthwatering balls — boudin balls, that is. And we round out the show with a discussion about the "chill" attitude of Louisianians from culinary heavyweight David Chang.

Revelations From Unexpected Artifacts

On this week's Louisiana Eats! we'll hear from Professor Jim Heimann as he talks about the evolution of restaurant menus in the the 20th century and how they chart the cultural values of America. Then, documentary filmmaker Peggy Scott Laborde gets nostalgic about New Orleans' favorite food and drinks.

Plus, Dr. Gourmet returns with advice about salt, and Ian McNulty recommends a great spot just outside of Henderson, La.


im Heimann's new book about restaurant menus contains over 500 detailed images.   Credit New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad, 1932 (Private Collection)

im Heimann's new book about restaurant menus contains over 500 detailed images.

Credit New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad, 1932 (Private Collection)

New Orleans' Cultural Mashup

3-16-13 creolefood_0.jpg

This week on Louisiana Eats! we'll hear from Liz Williams, the director of the Southern Food & Beverage Museum, who will talk about her new book, New Orleans: A Food Biography. We'll also hear from Chef Matt Murphy about how and why he celebrates St. Patrick's Day with gratitude.

Plus, Ian McNulty swings by to chat about a great spot in Port Allen for Cajun meats and boudin.

Pasta Milanese

3 onions, chopped

1/4 cup olive oil

1 - 12 oz. can tomato paste

1 - 28 oz. can tomato puree

5 cloves garlic, chopped

2 - 2 oz tins of anchovies, chopped

1 small bunch of fresh fennel, chopped

1 tablespoon dried basil

½ teaspoon sugar

Salt and black pepper to taste

2 ½ cups of water

In a large saucepot, heat olive oil. Add the onions and sauté until translucent. Add all of the rest of the ingredients into the pot with the sautéed onions. Bring sauce to a slow simmer and cook uncovered over a medium low heat for one hour or more until thickened.

Serve over cooked spaghetti and sprinkle with mudrica.

Yields approximately 2 quarts. Freezes well.

Mudrica

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 cups stale breadcrumbs, finely grated

2 teaspoons sugar

Heat an iron skillet on a very low fire. Add the olive oil and breadcrumbs. Stir constantly so that crumbs do not burn, toasting until the crumbs are a golden brown. Remove from the fire and stir in sugar.