Familiar Voices At The Louisiana Eats! Table

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We've invited some of our favorite guests back for this week's edition of Louisiana Eats! They might have all been on the program before, but they've each got something new to bring to the table.

Environmental reporter Paul Greenberg explains why "the Dead Zone," in the Gulf of Mexico is expected to be larger than ever this summer. On a more light-hearted note, we'll be joined by Chef Tenney Flynn to discuss the strange requests he fulfills at his restaurant for some of his favorite customers.

Plus, Dr. Gourmet returns to the program for a discussion about cholesterol, Jyl Benson tells us about one of her favorite meat markets, and Ryan Hughes slices open some fragrant Australian citrus.

Why Do Louisianians Invest In Culinary Expertise?

  

Students at the Louisiana Culinary Institute had their professional and personal lives taped for an entire semester for a new reality television show called "The Freshmen Class."

Students at the Louisiana Culinary Institute had their professional and personal lives taped for an entire semester for a new reality television show called "The Freshmen Class."

The Tulane University Center for Culinary Medicine has found a new home on Broad Street. We'll be joined by the movers and shakers of the program on this week's Louisiana Eats!, including Dr. Gourmet and the country's first medical school chef.

Then, members of the Louisiana Culinary Institute join us to discuss their experience being filmed for a new reality TV show on the Cooking Channel called The Freshmen Class.

Plus, Harold McGee discusses the science of some household staples, and Frank McMains swings by with another great tip for dining in Louisiana.

Natural Food Advocates Share Their Tips For Healthy Living

Eliminating processed food from your diet does not mean you have to compromise flavor. For example, fried sage can bring a new dimension to some of your favorite dishes

Eliminating processed food from your diet does not mean you have to compromise flavor. For example, fried sage can bring a new dimension to some of your favorite dishes

We're cutting out processed foods on this week's Louisiana Eats! First we'll speak with Loretta Barrett Oden about the pragmatic culinary heritage of her Native American people. Then Penelope Dane joins the conversation to talk about gluten-free living. Finally, we'll wrap things up with a conversation about the different vegan dining experiences across the country.

Know Your Fisherman: Louisiana Direct Seafood Mends A Forgotten Relationship

On this week's edition of Louisiana Eats! we hear about a new program developed by LSU that allows consumers the opportunity to buy fresh catches directly from our state's fishermen.

Then we'll visit the kitchen of GW Finns to speak with Chef Tenney Flynn about safely handling seafood before it hits the pan.

And you’ll want to hear about the secret ingredient Ryan Hughes received from one of his hip friends in California. Here’s a hint: it had to be sent through the mail in an airtight container.

A series of technological advancements in the past decade has allowed Louisiana fishermen to sell their catches directly to the public, thereby eliminating middlemen and putting more money in their pockets.

A series of technological advancements in the past decade has allowed Louisiana fishermen to sell their catches directly to the public, thereby eliminating middlemen and putting more money in their pockets.

What's To Become Of The New Orleans Food Truck Scene?

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On this week's Louisiana Eats! New Orleans' councilwoman Stacy Head and Rachel Billow of the New Orleans Food Truck Coalition draft new food truck ordinances in New Orleans' political system.

We'll hear how the laws are outdated, find out why an approved ordinance was vetoed, and discuss plans for the future. Then, Greg Reggio joins us to talk about his involvement with the Taste Buds, a culinary and restaurant development company based in Louisiana. Plus, Jyl Benson and Ryan Hughes discuss great places to eat and unexpected ingredients to use in your kitchen.

Will Louisiana's Seafood System Go Commercially Extinct?

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Fresh seafood has helped define Louisiana's cuisine for centuries. This week a field of experts join us on Louisiana Eats! to discuss how our local seafood is caught, distributed and consumed.

We'll hear from Paul Greenberg about the environmental changes that threaten the Mississippi River shrimp; listen how members of the Gulf Seafood Trace program improve consumer relationships with local fishers; and find out how the shrimp industry has changed in the past 20 years from seafood distributor Louis Raines.

Jazz Fest Food: New Tastes For 2013

On average, Jazz Fest adds $300 million to the local economy and is expected to draw nearly half a million attendees this year.

And all of those people need to be fed.

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With over 70 food and beverage vendors, Jazz Fest does not disappoint. We spoke with Poppy Tooker, the host of WWNO's Lousiana Eats!, as she went through her annual ritual surveying the food booths at Jazz Fest. We got to preview some of the new dishes hitting the festival food scene.

Poppy's top picks to try?

1. Shrimp and Duck Pasta, from Crescent Catering. The WWNO team loved the noodles used for this dish, the tender duck and plenty of green onions. Poppy says this one's trying to edge in on Crawfish Monica, the classic Jazz Fest dish.

2. Ambrosia Tea. This replaces the infamous Mandarin Iced Tea. No word on the reason for the flavor change, but Poppy notes that Ambrosia "might be just the thing to quench your thirst fourth-quarter."

3. Japanese BBQ Po-Boy. Latest offering from Ninja, a beloved sushi and Japanese cuisine restaurant in New Orleans. 

Fried crawfish from Guil's.

4. Guil's Fried Crawfish. One of Poppy's first day must-eats is Gull's gator. That's tender bits of alligator meat, fried crisp. For the gator-shy in your group, Gull's has fried crawfish this year, mixed with fried onion and fried jalapeno rings. Our production crew also snacked on this — plenty of pepper kick to get us to deadline.

5. Crispy Wings and Fried Okra: New dishes from Jazz Fest classic vendor, the Praline Connection. Poppy also loves their traditional offering, the fried chicken livers with pepper jelly.

And let's round out this list to a lucky seven with two tried and true Jazz Fest Poppy Tooker traditions.

6. Breakfast of Champions: Poppy says nothing beats hot pork cracklins and a cold beer

7. Close out Jazz Fest like Poppy with a fried pork chop sandwich from Miss Linda Green's. Or maybe two. She'll eat one, and tuck the other in her purse as she strolls out of the Fair Grounds.

And remember all the hard work that brings you this feast at the Fest.

"The demands on the Jazz Fest vender is rigorous," says Poppy. For 24 hours a day, they're checking the temperature on the refrigerated trucks to make sure the food is being kept right. And the preparations are intense. The crawfish bisque, for example, has five stuffed crawfish heads in each bowl. The vendor Eddie Baquet has a single lady who stuffs crawfish heads months in advance, just preparing for Jazz Fest.

Happy Jazz Fest eating everyone! Stay tuned to WWNO for more on Jazz Fest food.

Jazz Fest Performers Take You Inside Their Kitchens and Out on the Road

Members of Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes rock out at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in 2005. The band returns to the Acura Stage on Thursday, May 2nd at 1:35pm.

Members of Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes rock out at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in 2005. The band returns to the Acura Stage on Thursday, May 2nd at 1:35pm.

Life on the road might be difficult for traveling musicians and their crews, but the perks of this lifestyle are almost impossible to replicate.

Chef Anne Churchill spends her summers traveling as a cook for one of rock's most popular touring bands and has the stories to prove it. She joins us on Louisiana Eats! to talk about the mammoth responsibilities of cooking at amphitheaters across the country.

We'll also hear from Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes, whose decade together on the road has honed their tastes for the weird and wild. Their firsthand accounts with late-night diners will get you hungry for donuts, Philly cheese steaks, and kangaroo burgers.

And when it's finally time to come home, few know our musicians better than Elsa Hahne. She'll share stories about getting these public figures to open up to her privately in their own kitchens.