Dreaming Of A Place At The Table

Dreaming Of A Place At The Table

On this week’s show, we take a look at immigration and its impact on the American food landscape. 

 

We begin with Rick Bayless, whose award-winning Frontera restaurants are bolstered by workers who come from immigrant backgrounds. Rick explains how many of his staff members were brought to the country as children and are now facing an uncertain future.

 

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Any Way You Slice It

Any Way You Slice It

On this week's show, we meet the great Dario Cecchini, a world renowned Italian butcher. Dickie Brennan invited the Cecchini family to New Orleans earlier this year to return the exceptional hospitality Dario had extended to Dickie’s son, Richard Brennan III, who served as Dario’s apprentice in Italy.

 

Dario and his wife, Kim, join us in the studio to talk about their life and work in Panzano, a little village in Italy's Chianti region. Then, we hear from Richard Brennan III about his extraordinary apprenticeship.

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Acadiana Road Show

Acadiana Road Show

On this week's show, we're traveling through Acadiana to explore traditional and contemporary Cajun foodways. We begin with George Graham, who shares his obsession through stories of cooking in the region through his nationally recognized  blog and book, Acadiana Table: Cajun and Creole Home Cooking from the Heart of Louisiana.

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A Feast For The Senses

A Feast For The Senses

This week’s show is, in a word, sensational. Join us as we delve into the many ways that our other four senses experience food.


We begin in Baton Rouge at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum. Their food photography exhibit, A Feast for the Eyes, runs the gamut from still lifes to the avant-garde. And it’s on view at LASM through September 16.

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A Shot of History Mixed With Inspiration at Tales

A Shot of History Mixed With Inspiration at Tales

It's July in New Orleans, which means two things: scorching temperatures and the hottest event in the spirits world — Tales of the Cocktail! On this week's show, we look at the annual summertime conference that brings the international cocktail scene to the Crescent City.

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Culinary Revolutionaries

Culinary Revolutionaries

On this week's show, we discuss sustainable food policy with culinary revolutionaries from around the world.

While growing up, Michel Nischan spent a lot of time on his grandfather’s farm. So the thought of eating fresh food was second nature to him. Now he's focused on changing food policy on a federal level.

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Breaking The Bonds of Silence: :Louisiana Eats Tours The Whitney Slavery Museum

In this special edition of Louisiana Eats, we celebrate Juneteenth — the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

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We take a trip to the Whitney Plantation, the only plantation museum in America that focuses entirely on slavery. The vision for the museum originated with attorney and developer John Cummings, who invested 10 million of his own dollars to help educate the public about the truths of slavery in Louisiana.

The Whitney Plantation is one of three surviving Civil War-era sugar plantations located in St. John the Baptist Parish along the Mississippi River. There, we join Director of Research at Whitney Dr. Ibrahima Seck, who gives us a personal tour of the property.

 

We make our first stop at a restored nineteenth century Baptist church, where we learn about slavery as viewed through the eyes of children. Not far from the church, Dr. Seck brings us to a large monument engraved with names and information about the enslaved individuals who lived at Whitney. We also step into a slaves' quarters and tour the oldest detached kitchen in Louisiana, making our final stop at the big house where the Haydel family lived.

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Following our visit to the plantation, we speak with Sybil Haydel Morial — educator, activist and former First Lady of New Orleans — who recently learned of her family's connection to the Whitney Plantation. Sybil chronicled her breadth of experience during the civil rights era and the years that followed in her memoir, Witness to Change.

Happy Birthday, Louisiana Eats!

Happy Birthday, Louisiana Eats!

n this week's show, we’re celebrating the 8th anniversary of our show's debut! 


We're digging through the archives for some of our favorite moments from the past 8 years, starting from the very beginning. The first episode of Louisiana Eats broadcast on June 9, 2010. That year also marked the 125th anniversary of New Orleans’ streetcar line. We look back at our very first field piece, when we took a streetcar ride with the late, great historian Michael Mizell-Nelson

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Not Your Typical Cup of Joe

Not Your Typical Cup of Joe

There’s nothing like a cup of good, hot coffee. On this week's show, we look at the art of the coffee bean in our state and beyond. 

We begin with a local favorite—PJ’s Coffee—which Phyllis Jordan founded 40 years ago. Phyllis reflects on the early years, when she became the first commercial iced coffee purveyor in New Orleans.

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Toasting The Tricentennial - Part Deux

Toasting The Tricentennial - Part Deux

On this week's show, we continue our tricentennial tribute to New Orleans with a look at brand new research in the field of archeology. We speak to Jim Bruseth and Toni Turner, who reveal a surprising turn of events that preceded the city's official founding. Evidently, if the French explorer La Salle hadn't blundered in his attempt to form a colony here, we would have been celebrating our 300th birthday 30 years ago.

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